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I am Aashi. A 13 year-old girl. I live in a boarding school. I remember I was very upset when my parents announced that I was going to study in a boarding school. Over these years I have realised the importance of friends, especially best friend.

But what if your best friend lies to you? Secretly develops a competitive attitude and refuses to help?

Misha and I connected immediately and became best friends. Now, the entire school knows about our friendship.

That night I couldn't concentrate on my studies. I was looking at Misha, who was engrossed in finishing her homework. She looked at me once, smiled casually and resumed her studies.

The bell rang, and commotion replaced the silence.
"Let's go." Misha said and headed towards the door. I didn't move. She returned back. "What happened? It's dinner time. Let's go," She held my hand and almost dragged me.

In the dining hall, everyone chatted and laughed but I was feeling lost and restless. Had I done something that I was not supposed to do? Something wrong? My mind raced few hours back. Fifth period was Ryan Sir's General Knowledge class. He has a unique pattern of teaching. He conducts quiz every third day. He asks a question one by one until someone answers it correctly. He praises when someone answers correctly. Everyone tries hard to impress him.

"How long does it take for the light from the sun to reach the earth?" He asked. No one could answer. It was Misha's turn. She stood silent, looking down at the desk. Sir was clearly annoyed.

After the class, when we were heading the hostel, she said. "I was expecting that answer from you."

I knew it. That's why she was looking down at the desk. We often helped each other in such a condition by scribbling the answer in our notebooks when any of our friends were looking down at the desk.

"I didn't know the answer." I lied. She curled her lips in dismay. Actually, the next turn was mine and I wanted to impress Ryan Sir with my smart answer. But my turn didn't come. When Misha could not answer, Ryan sir answered the question for us, and curtly advised us to concentrate and study sincerely. I was utterly disappointed but later I felt thankful.

"What's wrong with you? Are you feeling okay? Misha shook me back to the present. I just nodded.

"She is looking lost today," Deepti commented.

Back in our room, while we were preparing to sleep, I called Misha. She came right away and sat next to me with a questioning yet relaxed glance. I was jealous of her relaxed mind. I couldn't carry that baggage any more.

"Today, I lied to you," I said. She frowned. "I knew the answer today. I didn't help you because...because I wanted to impress Ryan Sir," I vented out my restlessness. She looked utterly disappointed and sad. She said nothing. She switched off the light and went to sleep.

I kept thinking about it for a long time then slowly slipped into the slumber. Next morning, when I woke up she was not in the room. I was feeling ashamed, and thought that our friendship had lost its trust. It was perhaps over.

After a while, Misha rushed into the room and came straight to me. "Come, it's breakfast time," She held my hand as if nothing had happened.

"You are not angry with me?" I asked meekly.

She looked at me for a while then said, "I was but if someone feels disturbed and restless after telling a lie, it means that person is true at heart. And I could see that you were really disturbed," So thoughtful and insightful! I thought.

"Thank you and I am really sorry," I truly was!

"It's okay. I love your honesty!" She said and smiled.

That day, I realised that honesty and truth are priceless and bring so much relief.

Have a look at this Kinley video. It's nice.



This post is written for Indiblogger in association of Kinley (Purity in every drop)











Finished reading a book that starts with Christmas and ends with Christmas, so decided to post this review today. I am talking about “Fashionably yours” by Swati Sharma (Harlequin India)

Fashionably Yours is a one year journey of Maya Kapoor's life in diary form. Maya, who is a fashion writer in a fashion magazine Style but her dream is to write for her dream magazine Glamourous, hails from Shimla and lives in her dream city, Mumbai. Unfortunately, she finds herself at the same place where she was two years back.

Maya is a disorganized 25 years old girl who has never been in a relationship and searching for her Mr. Right. Her mother thinks she has ruined her life, but her father completely understands her. She doesn’t get along with her younger sister but has a sister like best friend. She has a rude rather cruel boss but deeply crushes on a devastatingly fashion photographer and finds herself totally unfit for him.

Overall, this is a modern tale of Maya’s winding life. Will she achieve her dream ever and what about her crush rather love? Read this book to find out!

The content is interesting. I particularly liked the humour. Situations are interesting and characters are nicely sketched. The male protagonist is a little incomprehensible but maybe it’s because to keep the suspense factor. The storyline is interesting and author manages to keep the reader interested. However, it goes plain a couple of times. The writing style is nice but there are several grammatical and writing errors which could have been avoided. For a diary form, sometimes, I missed the smoothness in the narration.

This book is definitely not for those who seek literary crispness. But, if you like to read a light ChickLit, you’ll find it interesting and enjoyable. For me it was an interesting, light and easy read.

I wish you all a Merry Christmas!

I got this review copy from the author. Thanks Swati!











There is an old stair that leads to a half built house. As I climbed up, I see a serene river, glinting in the aura of crimson evening. A faraway boat enhances the charm of mesmerizing vista. A sense of déjà vu hits me. Everything around looks so familiar!

 I look at a half built house and I proceed towards it. There is a compact room. A little girl with furling hairs is playing hopscotch. She is wearing a frilled frock but I can’t see her face as her back is towards me. Soon, another little girl joins her. It seems that I know this girl. Suddenly, a little boy arrives chuckling. He is the cousin of the second girl. Wait! How do I know that? I am bewildered. They start playing together jubilantly, neglecting me totally. I am eager to have a look at that first girl who was playing hopscotch.

A shrilling sound trembles the view. Suddenly, that girl, with furling hairs turns to look at me and smiles, leaving me utterly shocked. I recognise her instantly. It’s me!

I open my eyes to a glowing morning. I smile as I realize that I have just revisited my childhood in my dream.


I had is bizarre dream two nights back. Have you ever revisited your childhood in your dreams?

Sharing with: Three Word Wednesday
                        Theme Thursday










The title, the cover and the theme of More Tears to Cry by bestselling author Jean Sasson attracted my interest. The author has told such stories before in the previous series of this book but the fourth one is my first read. And reading the latest book first did not affect the flow because the book starts with a detailed backdrop that gives a fair idea about the previous stories and experiences. And I really liked reading that.

More tears to cry is a unique collection of true stories about the lives of Saudi Arabian women. It has been told through the eyes of Princess Sultana. In these touching and revealing stories, author has intensely described the restrictions, struggles and challenges of Saudi Arabian women. And most surprising thing is that such conditions are irrespective of class. Princess Sultana narrates the inside stories of one of the richest yet conservative kingdoms. The person whom she marries, her siblings, her daughters, servants, her palace, many different people she meets, everything falls in these stories. 

It’s about love, concern, justice and different perspectives. Basically, this book dwells in varied lives of different women of Saudi Arabia. It’s about their efforts of finding their own suitable ways.

The narration is detailed and subtle, covering various emotions and thoughts. As they are true stories, they seem well researched. Sometimes shocking, sometimes inspiring and sometimes enlightening.

Writing style is neat and crisp, but sometimes the story seemed a little stretched and repetitive. I think, writing from different and suitable point of views would have been more interesting and apt.

Overall, it was a nice read that reveals, educates, jolts and moves emotionally. Recommended for women readers.


I received this book from the publisher Random House India for an honest review.